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Jessie Arneson

Jessie Arneson

Research Associate

School of Molecular Biosciences

Dr. Arneson is a STEM education researcher with training and experience teaching undergraduate and graduate students in biochemistry, genetics, micro- and molecular biology. She was one of the first STEM education researchers to receive an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and has since presented and published work on visual literacy, student cognition, and assessment in the molecular life sciences. For nearly 10 years, Dr. Arneson has mentored REU students in how to analyze, interpret, and present scientific data.

Paul Buckley

Associate Clinical Professor

Department of Chemistry

Dr. Buckley teaches large-lecture general chemistry and preparatory chemistry and serves as both the Director of General Chemistry and Assessment Coordinator for the department. He has extensive experience mentoring undergraduate students in coursework and in research, and currently, mentors graduate TAs in best teaching practices. Dr. Buckley has routinely published in the Journal of Chemical Education. He recently developed a novel curricular approach to preparatory chemistry and is now collecting data on the success of this approach. Dr. Buckley also has extensive teaching experience within a PUI setting at Lewis-Clark State College near WSU.

Andy Cavagnetto

Associate Professor

Department of Teaching and Learning, School of Biological Sciences

Dr. Cavagnetto studies classroom interactions in biology learning contexts. He specializes in supporting data interpretation and argumentation from evidence in introductory biology labs and lectures at the university level. Cavagnetto has published several articles in top educational research journals and extensive experience mentoring undergraduate students in his lab, typically supporting two to four undergraduate students per semester. These students present at the WSU undergraduate research symposium and some have presented at national science education conferences. Cavagnetto is currently writing up a recent study with two undergraduate mentees. He also serves as an advisor and faculty mentor for pre-service science teachers.

Erica Crespi

Associate Professor

School of Biological Sciences

Dr. Crespi is an NSF and NIH-funded biologist who is involved in the development of active learning and inquiry-based curriculum in the biological sciences in both large university and small liberal arts undergraduate environments. This work has been funded by the Teagle Foundation, Society for Developmental Biology, and a Smith Teaching and Learning Award at WSU. Dr. Crespi has engaged more than 60 undergraduate students in independent research projects and hundreds of students conducting research in her animal physiology and development courses. Many of these undergraduates have presented at regional and international conferences, received awards, are co-authors on published scientific papers, and have entered graduate or professional school in the sciences. She is a member of the WSU Teaching Academy and the Academic Outreach and Innovation community.

 

Anya Guy

Assistant Professor

Department of Physics

Dr. Anya Guy’s primary work is implementing research-based instructional practices in undergraduate physics courses. Currently, she is developing an undergraduate Learning Assistant Program to support the implementation of active-learning curriculum in WSU’s large enrollment introductory physics courses and revamping the Physics and Your World (Physics 150) course to better meet the needs of WSU students working towards their elementary education and middle science teaching endorsements.

Molly Kelton

Assistant Professor

Department of Teaching and Learning

Dr. Kelton is a STEM education researcher in WSU’s College of Education. Dr. Kelton has conducted research on undergraduate STEM persistence and retention, and brings key expertise in all three of RISE’s focal research strands. Her research focuses on building interdisciplinary partnerships across formal, informal, and community organizations to design and study expansive, equitable, and culturally relevant STEM learning environments across the lifespan. Dr. Kelton has mentored several undergraduate students through honors-level research projects in STEM education, and was selected as a WSU Community Engagement Faculty Fellow for her work integrating service learning into her undergraduate courses in mathematics education.

Jeremy Lessman

Clinical Associate Professor

Department of Chemistry

Dr. Lessmann has taught at all levels in the chemistry department (i.e., Introductory Chemistry, Graduate Analytical and Radiochemistry) but is primarily responsible for the undergraduate Quantitative Analysis and Instrumental Analysis laboratory courses. He serves as the Academic Advisor to all Chemistry majors and minors. He is heavily involved in coordinating Academic Advising across WSU, helping revise and assess the Strategic Plan for Academic Advising and pilot and assess a new advising model for the University. He assists in assessment of the Chemistry Department’s curriculum as part of its Curriculum Committee and sits on the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee for the School of Molecular Biosciences. Dr. Lessmann has mentored a number of undergraduate researchers over the years and some of their work has lead to published research.

Phil Mixter

Associate Professor

School of Molecular Biosciences

Dr. Mixter is an advocate for undergraduate student success and dedicates significant time to mentoring students in how to prepare for their next career steps. Dr. Mixter teaches third- and fourth-year bioscience majors, and integrates career development opportunities such as professional writing and CV writing into his courses. Dr. Mixter is faculty advisor for the Molecular Biosciences Club and a faculty for WSU’s award winning Team Mentoring Project ( for underrepresented STEM students. While working to innovate in the classroom, Dr. Mixter engages in educational research to gain insights into student motivations, attitudes and decision-making. Dr. Mixter’s strengths are to maintain relationships with students post graduation and connect them as professionals.

 

Erika Offerdahl

Professor

School of Molecular Biosciences

Dr. Offerdahl has an enduring interest in improving undergraduate STEM learning. Her research focuses on classroom assessment in STEM, visual literacy in the molecular life sciences, and scientific argumentation. Over the past 10 years, she has mentored and trained 20 undergraduate students (four as co-authors on peer-reviewed manuscripts, 14 on conference presentations). These students have continued on to graduate school in STEM, K-12 STEM teaching positions, medical and dental school, and the biotechnology industry. Two have received a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

Gretchen Rollwagen-Bollens

Associate Professor

School of Biological Sciences, School of the Environment

Dr. Rollwagen-Bollens has devoted 30+ years to teaching undergraduates – 9 of those years teaching oceanography and scientific research to students during semester-long cruises aboard a sailing/research vessel in the North Atlantic and Caribbean, and the last 15 years at WSU Vancouver teaching biology and environmental science primarily to first-year Biology majors. Dr. Rollwagen-Bollens has incorporated a course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) into the Biology 106 course for majors, with an emphasis on increasing retention and academic success of non-traditional (first generation, older, veteran, minority) students – the dominant student demographic on the WSU Vancouver campus.  Dr. Rollwagen-Bollens has recently added DBER into her overall scientific research program, and is now engaging her graduate students in such research in addition to their disciplinary research topics.

Amy Roth McDuffie

Professor

Department of Teaching and Learning

Dr. Roth McDuffie conducts research on the professional development of prospective and practicing teachers in mathematics education. She focuses on supporting teachers’ learning in and from practice in the areas of teachers’ use of curriculum resources and culturally relevant pedagogies as part of developing equitable instructional practices. Roth McDuffie has numerous publications in top educational research journals and practitioner journals. She has edited three books published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and published several book chapters for researchers, teacher educators, and teachers. Roth McDuffie has served as a PI/Co-PI on three National Science Foundation-funded research projects, as well as several other grants. She has extensive experience mentoring graduate and undergraduate research assistants, as well as advising graduate and pre-service teacher education students.