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Hampton Lab Stephanie Hampton

ASLO 2020 Awards

We are looking forward to a virtual reception for the ASLO 2020 awards! It is happening on 1 Dec 2020 at noon ET (9am PT). The Limnology & Oceanography Bulletin also featured a Q&A with the 2020 Awardees, and for those of us who were scheduled to receive the awards at the Summer 2020 meeting (cancelled due to COVID), our talks will be posted on the ASLO YouTube channel. All in all, it makes me feel very appreciated – thanks to ASLO!

Looking at parasites on Lake Baikal plankton

Our Russian and American team has published a paper on the Saprolegnia infections that occur on Lake Baikal’s dominant zooplankton, the copepod Epischurella! It’s online early just now, lined up for publication in the hardcopy Limnology & Oceanography soon. First author Ted Ozersky pointed out that it’s the first time he’s had the experience of a project taking so long to complete that the genus name was updated between the first and final draft – from Epischura to Epischurella! (Personally, I have had projects take longer.) One of our team members, Larry Bowman, contributed that revised genus name, so at least we were the first to know when it happened!

Lake Baikal’s dominant zooplankton, the copepod Epischurella baikalensis, covered with the parasite Saprolegnia

New paper motivating future research on lake ice dynamics

Excited to see the first paper from our AGU Chapman conference on winter limnology now published in JGR Biogeosciences! Sapna Sharma led the team to synthesize ideas for future research by integrating in situ and remote sensing observations, physical based models, and experiments. With winter changing so rapidly, and increasing interest from limnologists, we are looking forward to seeing some innovative new research coming out of this continuing work!

Winter Limnology 2019 conference recap

This week Eos published our short overview of the AGU Chapman Conference we hosted in October 2019 on Winter Limnology in a Changing World. Attendees came out of the conference with a better understanding of where we are in the science, and the feasibility of future projects that can help sustain research momentum. At least one manuscript is already forthcoming, several more are in progress, and a special issue is underway in JGR Biogeosciences.

Ted Ozerksy standing on Lake Baikal ice.

New Global Change Biology paper on integrating limnology approaches

“The case for research integration, from genomics to remote sensing, to understand biodiversity change and functional dynamics in the world’s lakes” is now published in final version with Global Change Biology! This was my first collaboration with Steve Thackeray after many interesting and engaging conversations over the years – really fun to think about why and how we should be developing more integrative approaches to doing limnology. (Adding a pic of Crater Lake to this post because it’s a pretty lake and I love our National Park Service lakes!)

Crater Lake National Park