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Department of Psychology Gartstein Temperament Lab

Personnel

The Gartstein Temperament Lab meets regularly to collaborate on research efforts and publications.  Our former lab members have gone on to positions in academia and the private sector.  We additionally work closely with remote research teams in the United States and beyond – for more information, see our Partners page.

Our current team members include:

Masha Gartstein

Masha Gartstein

Dr. Gartstein’s research addresses temperament development, primarily in early childhood. The emphasis on identifying typical trajectories of growth for reactive and regulatory tendencies is coupled with efforts to discern risk and protective factors relevant to the emergence of psychopathology.  Dr. Gartstein has examined a spectrum of environmental factors contributing to temperament attributes “coming online”, including parental temperament, parenting/parent-child interactions, and cultural influences. More recently, her work has focused on biological underpinnings of temperament, examining prenatal effects and postnatal physiological correlates. Current studies are addressing effects associated with maternal physiological and psychosocial stress during pregnancy, including epigenetic mechanisms. The Gartstein laboratory has also been collecting infant electroencephalogram (EEG) data reflecting brain activity associated with reactive and regulatory aspects of temperament. Another project wherein genomic parameters of infant microbiome are identified and linked with temperament attributes is currently underway. This research is conducted in collaboration with several WSU laboratories, as well as multiple domestic and international partners.


 

Alyssa Neumann

Alyssa Neumann

I graduated from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse with Psychology and Pre-Med majors and a Biology minor in 2014, and I joined the Infant Temperament Lab just over a year later, when I started the WSU Clinical Psychology program in 2015. My research interests mainly focus on the developmental outcomes of factors related to the prenatal environment (such as a mother having mental health issues or taking various medications during pregnancy). It has been neat to make connections between what I am learning and a previous job working with parents and children who experienced domestic abuse and were usually recovering from trauma. Apart from school work and research, I enjoy gallivanting around the Palouse and traveling. I am on the “Child track” in the program and eventually hope to enter a career in pediatric psychology!

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Allegra X. Campagna

Allegra X. Campagna

I am a 3rd year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology program here at WSU. I graduated from Arizona State University in 2017 with degrees in Biology and Psychology. My research interests are in mother-infant interactions, emotion regulation in infancy, and psychophysiology methods such as electroencephalography (EEG). In addition to research, teaching, seeing clients, and taking classes, I enjoy gardening and hiking with my dog and friends.

 


 

Jennifer Mattera

Jennifer Mattera

I graduated from Providence College in 2014 with a double major in Biology and Psychology.  After graduating, I worked as a research assistant for over three years at Brown University where I studied the differential effects of prenatal exposure to depression and antidepressants on developmental outcomes during infancy and early childhood.  I joined the Infant Temperament Lab in 2018 and am responsible for coordinating the Pregnancy, Health and Motherhood Study.  I am specifically interested in studying how stressors during pregnancy, such as depression and anxiety, relate to socio-emotional functioning in young children via biological mechanisms.  I hope to apply these research interests to treating at-risk children exhibiting behavioral and emotional dysregulation in order to prevent these difficulties from developing into more severe psychological disorders.

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Kara Brown

I am currently a first year graduate student here at Washington State University. I graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2019 with a B.S. in psychology and a minor in sociology. I joined the Infant Temperament Lab that following fall as a graduate student in clinical psychology. My research interest mainly includes the neurobiological underpinnings of temperament using electroencephalography (EEG) to better understand emotion regulation and its impact on development.

 

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Our alumni graduate students include:

 

Natalia Potapova, PhD
Eric Desmarais