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CURRENT MEMBERS

Graduate Students

 

Jessica Collins in Ethiopia
Jessica Collins in Ethiopia

JESSICA COLLINS

Jessica Collins is an MA student in evolutionary anthropology working with Dr. Meehan. She is interested in the evolved mechanisms involved in infant care and how it relates to other aspects of our evolutionary history, such as elongated childhoods, cooperative breeding, prosociality, and altruism. She has spent three field seasons in Ethiopia and is defending her MA in spring 2017. Jessica received her B.S. in anthropology from the University of Idaho.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wolayte Bogale in Ethiopia

WOLAYTE BOGALE
Wolayte Bogale is a PhD student in cultural Anthropology working with Dr. Courtney Meehan. She earned her bachelor degree from BahirDar University in Ethiopian language studies in 2006 and her MA from Addis Ababa University in Sociolinguistics in 2009. She has been faculty at Bahirdar and Hawassa Universities in Ethiopia. Her dissertation will focus on Ethiopian childhood and family life. She is also a collaborator on the NSF INSPIRE human breast milk composition project in Ethiopia.

Publication:
Wolayte Bogale. 2009. Education language policy and its implementation: Wolayta Sodo primary schools. VDM Verlarg: Germany. ISBN: 978-3-639-22240-1

 

 

 

 

Avery Lane

AVERY LANE

Avery Lane is currently working toward her MA in Evolutionary Anthropology under the advisement of Drs. Courtney Meehan (WSU Anthropology, Shelley McGuire (WSU Biological Sciences), and Ed Hagen (WSU-Vancouver Anthropology). She received Bachelor’s degrees in Anthropology and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology from the University of Arizona. Her primary research interest concerns the environmental and sociocultural factors which are thought to influence variation in the human microbiome. She has broader interests in cooperative breeding and the evolution of sociality in mammals, and has conducted field work on both human and non-human primates in Costa Rica, Madagascar, and Ethiopia. Her Master’s research will explore how social network density and household composition influence infant gastrointestinal microbial communities, from a cross-cultural perspective.

 

 

 

Katherine Flores (center) in Ethiopia summer 2015
Katherine Flores (center) in Ethiopia summer 2015

KATHERINE FLORES

Katie Flores is a Ph.D. student in cultural anthropology working with Dr. Marsha Quinlan. She is interested in medical anthropology, particularly reproductive health and its place within traditional medical systems. Katie served as a research assistant for the INSPIRE project and assisted with data collection in Ethiopia. She is further collaborating with Dr. Meehan on a project exploring environmental risk and parental investment among the Sidama in Ethiopia and is also working on a project alongside Dr. Meehan and Elisa Garrett analyzing Sidama nursing patterns.

Publications:

Flores, K. E. & Quinlan, M. B. (2014). Ethnomedicine of menstruation in rural Dominica, West Indies. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 153(3), 624-634.

Undergraduate Students

 

GUYNES

KEROSHINI (KERO) GUYNES

Keroshini Guynes is completing her degree in anthropology with a minor in biology at Washington State University. She is determined to pursue her graduate studies in biological anthropology with research interests in paleopathology and paleoepidemiology. Kero was born and raised mostly in Malaysia and is fluent in five languages

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lora ProsserLORA PROSSER

Lora Prosser is a senior at Washington State University studying anthropology with a minor in biology.  She was born and raised in Anchorage, Alaska.  She is interested in biocultural and medical anthropology and plans on pursuing a master’s in public health.  In addition to her internship in the Biocultural Anthropology Lab, Lora is the president of the WSU Anthropology Club and is an active member of Chi Omega.

 

 

 

Corey Rathe
Corey Rathe

COREY RATHE

Corey Rathe is a current junior at Washington State University pursuing a double major in anthropology and French with an expected graduation of spring 2018. She intends to pursue a masters of public health in biostatistics and is excited to combine her love of humanity and her passion for the sciences. Alongside her laboratory internship, she is an active member of Kappa Delta Sorority and is very thankful that she transferred to Washington State University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Youatt
Elizabeth Youatt

ELIZABETH YOUATT

Elizabeth Youatt graduated from WSU in 2016 with a B.S. in psychology and an animal science minor. In addition to working in the Biocultural Anthropology Lab, she is also currently working in the WSU Infant Temperament Lab with Masha Gartstein and the WSU Child Cognition Lab. She plans to pursue a Ph.D. in psychology and continue to study child development across multiple contexts. She enjoys riding her horse almost every day and teaching riding lessons throughout the Pacific Northwest, as well as assisting with the training of 3-day event horses.

Gloria Yates
Gloria Yates

GLORIA YATES

Gloria Yates is a junior at Washington State University majoring in anthropology with a minor in psychology. She was raised in Eastern Washington. Interning allows for gaining experience in cultural anthropology and helps reach the future goal of a MA and possibly PhD. in cultural anthropology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elisa Garrett
Elisa Garrett

ELISA GARRETT

Elisa Garrett is a junior at Washington State University currently pursuing a degree in anthropology with a minor in comparative ethnic studies. Elisa is passionate about cultural anthropology and is interested in public outreach with disadvantaged communities. Elisa is also president of the WSU Knitting Club and an active member of KZUU and helps plan music events around Pullman. She is currently working on a project alongside Dr. Meehan and Katie Flores analyzing Sidama nursing patterns.

Previous Lab Members

Graduate Students

 

Courtney Helfrecht in Ethiopia.
Courtney Helfrecht in Ethiopia.

COURTNEY HELFRECHT

Courtney Helfrecht completed her Ph.D. in 2016. Her research takes a biocultural approach to the evolution of childhood, integrating data on ontogeny and adaptability, nutritional status, ethnography, cognitive development, ecology, and human biology to evaluate the effects of stress in life history patterning. Courtney has conducted this research among Aka foragers and Ngandu horticulturalists in CAR since 2008 and among Sidama agropastoralists in SW Ethiopia since 2014. She is additionally investigating hair hormone analysis as a method for assessing biological development. Her research has revealed unexpected patterns of adrenal maturation among these three populations, suggesting significant variation from known life history patterns. Courtney was the Assistant Project director on Dr. Meehan’s NSF funded research project in the Central African Republic for several years.

Publications
Meehan CL, Helfrecht C, and Malcom CD. 2016. Implications of lengthy development and maternal life history: allomaternal investment, peer relationships and social networks. In Origins and Implications of the Evolution of Human Childhood. C.L. Meehan and A.N. Crittenden, eds. Santa Fe, NM: School of Advanced Research (SAR) Press and Albuquerque NM: University of New Mexico Press.

Helfrecht C and Meehan CL. 2016. Sibling effects on nutritional status: intersections of cooperation and competition across development. American Journal of Human Biology, 28:159–170.

Meehan CL, Helfrecht C, and Quinlan R. 2014. Allomaternal networks and children’s nutritional status: is flexibility key to cooperative breeding? American Journal of Physical Anthropology 153(4): 513-525.

Hess N, Helfrecht C, Hagen E, Sell A, and Hewlett B. 2010. Interpersonal aggression among Aka hunter-gatherers of the Central African Republic.” Human Nature 21(3): 330-354.

 

Jennifer Roulette in Tanzania
Jennifer Roulette in Tanzania

JENNIFER ROULETTE

Jennifer Roulette is in the cultural anthropology PhD program at Washington State University working with Dr. M. Quinlan. Her work focuses on understanding the development of ethnomedical knowledge among sub-Saharan African populations. Along with informing theoretical debates, her work targets public health concerns with culturally sensitive approaches and collaborations from the ground up, she collaborates in research projects in the Central African Republic, working with the Aka foragers and Ngandu farmers, as well as Tanzanian Maasai pastoralists. She was the Assistant Project Director on Dr. Meehan’s NSF funded CAREER project in the Central African Republic. Her publications reflect her research interests in medical anthropology, anthropology of childhood, and sub-Saharan Africa. The paper entitled, “Tobacco use vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers: self-medication in humans?” won the Margo Wilson Award. She also holds a Master’s degree in Human Development from Washington State University and has a paper in review at the Health Education journal based on her thesis work.

Quinlan, M. B., Quinaln, R., Council, S., and Roulette, J. W. (2016). Children’s acquisition of ethnobotanical knowledge in a Caribbean horticultural village. Journal of Ethnobiology. 36(2).

Roulette, C. J., Mann, H., Kemp, B. M., Remiker, M., Roulette, J. W., Hewlett, B. S., Kazanji, M., Breurec, S., Monchy, D., Sullivan, R. J., and Hagen E. H. (2014). Tobacco use vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers: self-medication in humans?. Evolution and Human Behavior. 35(5). 397-407.

Hewlett, B. S., & Roulette, J. W. (2014). Cosleeping beyond infancy: Culture, ecology, and evolutionary biology of bed sharing among Aka foragers and Ngandu farmers of Central Africa. In D. Narvaez, K. Valentino, A. Fuentes, J. M. McKenna, & P. Gray (Eds.), Ancestral landscapes in human evolution: Culture, childrearing and social wellbeing (pp. 129-163). Oxford University Press.

Meehan, C. L. & Roulette, J. W. (2013). Early supplementary feeding among central African foragers and farmers: a biocultural approach. Social Science & Medicine. 96. 112-120.

Placek, C. D. & Roulette, J. W. (2013). Fetal/fatal knowledge: new reproductive technologies and family-building strategies in India, by Sunil Khanna. Anthropology & Medicine. 20(2). 206-207.

 

 

Caitlyn Leonardson-Placek in India
Caitlyn Leonardson-Placek in India

CAITLYN PLACEK

Caitlyn Placek completed Ph.D. Evolutionary Anthropology  in 2016.  Her disseration chair was Dr. Edward Hagen. Her dissertation takes a biocultural approach to dietary preferences in pregnancy. She is also a collaborator on the ethnographic-experimental team for the Cultural Evolution of Religion Research Consortium (CERC) with Dr. Joseph Henrich and Dr. Ara Norenzayan. She has conducted research in South India since 2011 and worked in the Commonwealth of Dominica in 2010. She was the anthropology research assistant for the INSPIRE project under the direction of Dr. Courtney Meehan from 2015-2016. She is currently doing a NIH post-doc in India.

Publications:
Placek, C. D., & Hagen, E. H. (2015) Fetal Protection: The Roles of Social Learning and Innate Food Aversions in South India. Human Nature26(3), 255-276.

Council, S. K., & Placek, C. (2014). Cultural change and explicit anti-fat attitudes in a developing nation: A case study in rural Dominica. Social Medicine9(1), 11-21.

Placek, C. D., & Hagen, E. H. (2013). A test of three hypotheses of pica and amylophagy among pregnant women in Tamil Nadu, India. American Journal of Human Biology, 25(6), 803-813.

Placek, C. D., & Roulette, J. W. (2013). Fetal/fatal knowledge: new reproductive technologies and family-building strategies in India, by Sunil Khanna. Anthropology & Medicine, 20(2), 206-207.

Placek, C. D., & Quinlan, R. J. (2012). Adolescent fertility and risky environments: a population-level perspective across the lifespan. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, rspb20121022

 

Courtney MalcomCOURTNEY MALCOM
Courtney Malcom received her MA in evolutionary anthropology in 2014. Her research interests are in reproduction, maternal health and nutrition, infectious disease, as well as the biological and behavioral aspects of parent-offspring conflict. Her thesis is titled Maternal Energy Allocation and Investment among Central African Foragers and Farmers. Courtney worked in the biocultural lab from 2009-2014 and spent two field seasons in CAR, and one field season in Ethiopia as an Assistant Project Director.

Publications:
Meehan CL, Helfrecht C, and Malcom CD. 2016. Implications of lengthy development and maternal life history: allomaternal investment, peer relationships and social networks. In Origins and Implications of the Evolution of Human Childhood. C.L. Meehan and A.N. Crittenden, eds. Santa Fe, NM: School of Advanced Research (SAR) Press and Albuquerque NM: University of New Mexico Press.

Meehan, CL. Quinlan R. and Malcom CD. 2013. Cooperative breeding and maternal energy expenditure among Aka foragers. American Journal of Human Biology. 25(1):42-57.


Sreejith Thankappan

Emily Wolfe (field crew CAR 2012)

Kelli Weed (field crew CAR 2012)

Angela Sulfaro (field crew CAR 2012)

Mark Caudell (field crew CAR 2009)

 

Undergraduate Students

Sam Harris (field crew Ethiopia 2016)

Chelsea Baggette (field crew Ethiopia 2015)

Michelle Taylor (field crew Ethiopia 2014)

Briana Brenner (field crew CAR 2012)

Becca Prescott (field crew CAR 2011 & 2012)

Michelle Taylor (field crew CAR 2014)

Shantel Egger (field crew CAR 2011)

Samantha Post

Ashton Satterlee

Andrea Emde

Julie Wedam

Sarah Schuerger

Laura Chan

Randi Beardslee

Taylor Saunders