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Biological Systems Engineering Juming Tang, Ph.D.

The Motley Fool – Amazon May Have a New Plan to Take on Takeout

The Motley Fool  |  August 14, 2017

The company has reportedly been testing a technology most people associate with the military and survivalists: ready-to-eat meals that don’t require refrigeration.

Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) already challenges supermarkets in a number of ways, including offering grocery delivery in an ever-growing number of markets through its Fresh service. And, of course, the chain will be stepping up its grocery game when it completes its $13.7 billion purchase of Whole Foods Market, a deal expected to close before the end of 2017. [continue reading]

Source: Amazon May Have a New Plan to Take on Takeout

refinery29.com – AmazonFresh Ready To Eat Meals MRS MATS Prepared Food

refinery29.com  |  August 13, 2017

Amazon may dominate your shopping routine in terms of wires, cords, gadgets, and maybe even deodorant, but even with the siren song of AmazonFresh, you’re probably not getting all your food from the super site. Amazon’s looking to change that by bringing some old-school military tech into the modern day. According to Reuters, the retailer is looking into creating ready-to-eat food that doesn’t require refrigeration. [continue reading]

Source: AmazonFresh Ready To Eat Meals MRS MATS Prepared Food

Appsforpcdaily.com – Amazon Exploring New Food Technology To Eliminate Refrigeration Needs

Appsforpcdaily.com  |  August 13, 2017

The speed at which Amazon has become a food company is kind of wonderful, and Reuters reported Friday that Amazon is talking to a startup called 915 Labs about its MATS (microwave-assisted thermal sterilization) technology for possible use in future products. [continue reading]

Source: Amazon Exploring New Food Technology To Eliminate Refrigeration Needs

MSN – Amazon May Start Selling Meals

MSN  |  August 11, 2017

 

Not long after reports of Amazon filing trademarks for a meal-preparation service, it appears the retail giant may consider another service using an experimental method for prepackaged meals that come ready-to-eat. Using a technique called microwave assisted thermal sterilization or (MATS), Amazon is looking into selling pre-cooked dishes that do not require refrigeration. Designed primarily for military use, MATS puts sealed food in pressurized containers of water that are then heated using microwaves. These sealed packages can then be stored for up to a year without refrigeration. [continue reading]

 

Source: Amazon May Start Selling Meals

Investopedia – Amazon Looks to High Tech for its Prepared Meals

Investopedia  |  August 11, 2017

Amazon is looking at using advanced refrigeration tech in its push into the prepared meals market.

E-commerce giant Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) is looking at using refrigeration technology developed by the U.S. military for its push into the prepared meals marketplace. While the leading online retailer hasn’t made its aspirations in prepared meals official, it has filed for a trademark in the area, and 915 Labs, a Denver startup that is advancing the refrigeration technology, told Reuters Amazon has talked about selling ready-to-eat meals as early as 2018. [continue reading]

Source: Amazon Looks to High Tech for its Prepared Meals | Investopedia

ARS Technica – Military tech could be Amazon’s secret to cheap, non-refrigerated food

ARS Technica  |  August 11, 2017

Amazon is using everything at its disposal to take on the grocery and food delivery business. The online retailer purchased Whole Foods Market in June for $13.7 billion, announced new meal-prep boxes that challenge Blue Apron in July, and now it’s turning to the military for its next move. According to a CNBC report, Amazon wants to use military food technology to create prepared meals that don’t need to be refrigerated. This would allow the company to store and ship more food more efficiently and to offer ready-to-eat, (hopefully) tasty meals at a lower price. [continue reading]

 

Source: Military tech could be Amazon’s secret to cheap, non-refrigerated food | Ars Technica