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Biological Systems Engineering Juming Tang, Ph.D.

New Technology Extends Food Shelf-Life

Food Safety News  |  February 2010

Washington State University has developed a new technology that will allow food to look, taste, and be as nutritious as the original food but with a shelf-life of more than six months.

Juming Tang, a professor in the WSU Department of Biological Systems Engineering, led a team of industry, university, and U.S. military scientists to create this technology.  The outcome not only results in food with a longer shelf-life, but also food with better flavor and nutritional value when compared to more traditional food processing methods such as canning. [continue reading]

Source: New Technology Extends Food Shelf-Life

Engineering R&D: Move over, retort

Food Engineering  |  February 2010

The math of commercial cost and consumer willingness to pay remains to be calculated, but in-container sterilization with microwaves already has achieved several milestones. Researchers at Washington State University used a 40 KW pilot-scale microwave system to produce sterile, low-acid foods. Source: Washington State University. [continue reading]

Source: Engineering R&D: Move over, retort

US FDA approved first microwave sterilization process developed by Washington State University

IJABE  |  2010  |  Volume 3, No. 1

A revolutionary thermal processing technology us ing 915 MHz microwave energy has been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Professor Juming Tang, in the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University (WSU), led a team of university, industry and U.S. military scientists to develop the new technology. [continue reading]

Source: US FDA approved first microwave sterilization process developed by Washington State University

WSU Researcher’s Revolutionary New Food Processing Technology Dramatically Improves Food Quality and Nutrition, Gains FDA Approval

WSU CAHNRS News  |  October 2009

Imagine a salmon filet that looks, tastes and is as nutritious as freshly cooked salmon but has a shelf-life of more than six months. A new technology developed at Washington State University will make that dream a reality. [continue reading]

Source: WSU Researcher’s Revolutionary New Food Processing Technology Dramatically Improves Food Quality and Nutrition, Gains FDA Approval

Salmon may be getting a new wrap

Seattle Pi  |  April 2004

With a few phone calls and e-mails, Ketchikan fisherman Johnny Rice may have helped Alaska’s wild salmon out of the metal can and into a new niche market. Researchers in Washington state say they are close to perfecting a new method of microwaving food that not only gives salmon a grocery-store shelf life but delivers a fillet of restaurant-quality straight from a pouch — no refrigeration necessary. [continue reading]

Source: Salmon may be getting a new wrap

Microwaves improve processed food quality

SSC-Natick Press Release  |  March 2004

Microwave energy, long used in homes to cook or reheat food, is gaining momentum in the United States as a method for processing more palatable shelf-stable foods for the military and commercial market.

Already successfully used overseas as an alternative to frozen or refrigerated packaged foods, a partnership between the Department of Defense Combat Feeding Directorate at the Soldier Systems Center in Natick, Mass.; Washington State University (WSU) in Pullman, Wash.; and several food processing, equipment and packaging companies to process food through a microwave sterilization system is moving ahead with a fresh influx of federal and private sector funding. [continue reading]

Source: Microwaves improve processed food quality

Microwave sterilization kills bacteria while retaining high quality

THE WARROIR – Natick Newsletter  |  March-April 2004

Microwave energy, long used in homes to cook or reheat food, is gaining momentum in the United States as a method for processing more palatable shelf-stable foods for the military and commercial market.

Already successfully used overseas as an alternative to frozen or refrigerated packaged foods, a partnership between the Department of Defense Combat Feeding Directorate at the Soldier Systems Center in Natick, Mass.; Washington State University (WSU) in Pullman, Wash.; and several food processing, equipment and packaging companies to process food through a microwave sterilization system is moving ahead with a fresh influx of federal and private sector funding. [continue reading]

Source: Microwave sterilization kills bacteria while retaining high quality